Preventing Veterans Suicide

Four times as many troops and vets have died by suicide as in combat.

 

According to “High Suicide Rates among United States Service Members and Veterans of the Post 9/11 Wars” by Thomas Howard Suitt, III, Boston University, published on June 21, 2021: “Suicide rates among the United States public have been increasing for the past twenty years, but among active military personnel and veterans of the post-9/11 wars, the suicide rate is even higher, outpacing average Americans.”

 

“And numbers of troops deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan have dwindled from hundreds of thousands to just a few thousand troops, the DoD reported some of its highest suicide rates in 2018, 2019 and 2020.”

 

Tragically, suicide is an everyday occurrence. However, the humanitarian good deeds done, especially for our most vulnerable veterans, help save lives. Hopefully, September being Suicide Prevention and Awareness Month has increased awareness regarding that fact.

 

Making a Difference by Being the Difference

 

Because the only true way to know if you have prevented someone from committing suicide is if they tell you, there are many lives that even a single good deed has saved, unknowingly.

 

United Relief Foundation coming to the aid of veterans in need makes Life-Saving and Life-Changing differences accordingly to the veterans we served.

 

The differences made by United Relief Foundation’s Lifelines with the support of United Relief Foundation’s Hope and Help Volunteers, Donors, Partners, and Patrons may not always be tangible to the public, but they are very real to the veterans.

 

If you’re not sure how to engage with a veteran in need, contact us. 

Be There. Learn How.Suicide Prevention and Awareness
Veterans should never be homeless in AmericaChris Gardner